Mongrel

A collection of videos from various projects by the audio visual duo Mongrel: Anders Elberling (DK) and Henrik Frisk (SE).

FEEDBACK IMPRO, LIVE CODING (2015)

Varighed: 4:13, installationsloop
Størrelse: 1280 x 720 px
Live coding session Frisk/Elberling

www.iac.lu.se/projects/elbe...

Image Illiterates: The Mongrel

This artistic research project is concerned with trying to better understand the possible means for audio-video interaction in intermedia artworks. The project subtitle – The Mongrel – refers to a hybrid between audio and video that will not fall into either of the two categories of “music with video” or “moving images with music” but attempts to stay inbetween, balancing on the constantly moving critical point where equilibrium and a new possible form may take shape.
The Western world is saturated with images. Hundred of hours of video are uploaded to YouTube every minute and more than one billion unique visitors each month watching (YouTube, 2014). We are immersed in media to a point where the discussion concerning virtual reality becomes nearly ubiqiutous. For Paul Virilio the photographic snapshot and the optical illusion of cinema are part of the “sensory deprivations we owe to the technological and industrial wastage of our perceptual capacities” (Virilio, 2005, p. 74), ironically producing what Walter Benjamin dubbed the image illiterates (as cited in Virilio, 2005, p. 38).
In our project we are interested in entering this field asking questions concerning the roles of music and video in coexistence using the critical stance of Virilio, Baudrillard and others. Our method is to approach the narrative capacity of the themes we chose as our working material in order to find a common ground on which we can develop both the music and the video. In a twisted version of the the common third (Husen, 1994) we search for a joint aspect of the theme to be the negotiator between the different elements.

06_narativ2 noise road

#vimeo

Etude: Narrative dominance (2014)

Duration: 1:30
Format: 1280 x 720 px, stereo

A simple example of two synchronized loops.

This artistic research project is concerned with trying to better understand the possible means for audio-video interaction in intermedia artworks. The project subtitle – The Mongrel – refers to a hybrid between audio and video that will not fall into either of the two categories of “music with video” or “moving images with music” but attempts to stay inbetween, balancing on the constantly moving critical point where equilibrium and a new possible form may take shape.
The Western world is saturated with images. Hundred of hours of video are uploaded to YouTube every minute and more than one billion unique visitors each month watching (YouTube, 2014). We are immersed in media to a point where the discussion concerning virtual reality becomes nearly ubiqiutous. For Paul Virilio the photographic snapshot and the optical illusion of cinema are part of the “sensory deprivations we owe to the technological and industrial wastage of our perceptual capacities” (Virilio, 2005, p. 74), ironically producing what Walter Benjamin dubbed the image illiterates (as cited in Virilio, 2005, p. 38).
In our project we are interested in entering this field asking questions concerning the roles of music and video in coexistence using the critical stance of Virilio, Baudrillard and others. Our method is to approach the narrative capacity of the themes we chose as our working material in order to find a common ground on which we can develop both the music and the video. In a twisted version of the the common third (Husen, 1994) we search for a joint aspect of the theme to be the negotiator between the different elements.

iac.lu.se/projects/elberling-frisk/

SPIRALA (2013)

Varighed: 4:07, installationsloop
Størrelse: 1280 x 720 px
Rotation og digital feedback-effekt styres af patchen.

Visuelle maskiner (patches):
En visuel maskine er f.eks et computerprogram eller en serie af programmer, som både genererer og processer video, fotos og grafik i realtid. Dens output er både kendte og ukendte. Rammerne kan defineres, men i detaljeringsgraden er maskinens output oftes aleatorisk.

Elle a danse, il se tourna. (2013)

(feed for center Screen) for three channel video and 8-channel electronic sound installation as a part of Go To Hell Performed in the R1 Nuclear Reactor at KTH, Stockholm – Gent, Belgium and Hanoi, Vietnam

This work, commissioned for the performance installation Go to Hell in October 2013, is a reflection on the myth of the famous musician and poet Orpheus whose attempt to save his loved Eurydice from the underworld ends with fatal consequences.

There are many different transcriptions of the myth, the most commonly referred version is from the time of Virgil in which Eurydice died from a fatal bite while attempting to escape a satyr. Another Roman poet, Ovid, wrote a version in which Eurydice's death followed from her dancing with water nymphs on her wedding night. The moral undertone of this version is fascinating and opens up for different interpretations. The ending also exists in several versions of which some have less tragic outcomes than others.

In this work we have superimposed the different versions but focused on the moment of Orpheus' turning around, the fatal mistake that makes him loose Eurydice for good. Giving in to his desire to again see the face of his loved one (or is it perhaps his anxiety that Persephone and Hades have fooled him?) is undoubtedly a big mistake.

The video is a long ascending movement from the underworld and the original version with three screens made it impossible to see all screens at the same time. The viewer finds herself in a position similar to Orpheus' dilemma.

Go To Hell (2013)

Uddrag fra forestillingen i Stockholm
Videodesign

Go to Hell is an installation and performance work set on the threshold between gesture and sound and between the worlds of the dead and the living. The three musicians of the Vietnamese/Swedish group The Six Tones move through the subterranean landscape of the dismantled R1 nuclear reactor like mythological after-images. Fragments from the myth of Orpheus are double-exposed with the tale of a beheaded ghost from Vietnamese Tuong theatre. Evoked by the potential danger of the location, the audience is invited to explore an interactive and open form installation that relates to ancient myth and its bearings on experimental art of today. The choreographies and video art all relate to the gestural and conceptual content of Toccata Orpheus, a composition for guitar solo by the German composer Rolf Riehm.

In Toccata Orpheus it is the radical expression of the lyre player’s art that threatens the order of the underworld. Orpheus plays a high-risk game and exposes all the tricks of his musical and scenic skills expressed in intense choreographies of hand and arm movements. A new sound and video installation, by Anders Elberling and Henrik Frisk, an interactive sound and light installation by Gerhard Eckel and the interactive electronic soundscape in the space are derived from analysis of video recordings and of motion tracking data from performance of Riehm’s composition. The fragile plucked sounds and the details of gesture are transposed into an interactive multimedia composition of light, video, sound and movement in Go To Hell.

R1 was Sweden’s first nuclear reactor. It was operated from July 1954 until June 1970 at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) campus in Stockholm.